Introduction

The Indian Navy is the naval branch of the Indian Armed Forces. The President of India is the Supreme Commander of the Indian Navy. The Chief of Naval Staff, a four-star Admiral, commands the navy.

 Founded  1612
 Size  67,228 active personnel
 Garrison / Headquarter  New Delhi
 Motto  शं नो वरुणः (May the Lord of the Water be auspicious unto us)
 Anniversaries  4 December (Navy Day)
 Chief of Naval Staff  Admiral Sunil Lanba PVSM, AVSM, ADC
 Vice Chief of Naval Staff  Vice Admiral Ajit Kumar AVSM

The Indian Navy is a well-balanced and cohesive three-dimensional force, capable of operating above, on and under the surface of the oceans, efficiently safeguarding our national interests.

The Chief of the Naval Staff (CNS) exercises operational and administrative control of the Indian Navy from the Integrated Headquarters of Ministry of Defence (Navy). He is assisted by the Vice Chief of the Naval Staff (VCNS) and three other Principal Staff Officers, namely the Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff (DCNS), the Chief of Personnel (COP) and the Chief of Material (COM).

Commands

The Navy has the following three Commands, each under the control of a Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief:-

•The Western Naval Command (Headquarters at Mumbai).

•The Eastern Naval Command (Headquarters at Visakhapatnam)

•The Southern Naval Command (Headquarters at Kochi)

The Western and the Eastern Naval Commands are Operational Commands, and exercise control over operations in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal respectively. The Southern Command is the Training Command.

The cutting edge of the Indian Navy are its two Fleets, namely the Western Fleet, based at Mumbai and the Eastern Fleet, based at Visakhapatnam. Besides the Fleets, there is a Flotilla each, based at Mumbai, Visakhapatnam and Port Blair (A & N Islands), that provide Local Naval Defence in their respective regions. Naval ships are also based at other ports along the East and the West coasts of India and the island territories, thus ensuring continued naval presence in the areas of national interest. Further, there are various Naval Officer-in-Charges (NOICs), under each Command, responsible for the Local Naval Defence of ports under their respective jurisdictions.

The defence of the Andaman & Nicobar Islands is a joint responsibility of all the three services and is coordinated by the Headquarters, Andaman & Nicobar Command, located at PortBlair. This is the only Tri-Services Command in the Indian Armed Forces and is headed by a Commander-in-Chief, as appointed in rotation from the three Services. The Local Naval Defence of the Lakshadweep group of islands is the responsibility of the Naval Officer-in-Charge, Lakshadweep.

Future of the Indian Navy

The HAL Tejas Naval Prototype-1 takes-off from the Shore Based Test Facility at Goa

By the end of the 14th Plan (2019), the Indian Navy expects to have over 150 ships and close to 500 aircraft. In addition to the existing mission of securing both sea flanks in the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian sea, the navy would be able to respond to emergency situations far away from the mainland. Marine assault capabilities will be enhanced by setting up a new amphibious warfare facility at Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh.

The Indian Navy has initiated Phase II expansion of INS Kadamba, the third largest naval base, near Karwar. Phase II will involve expansion of the berthing facilities to accommodate 40–45 more front-line warships, including the aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya, raise manpower to 300 officers and around 2,500 sailors and build a naval air station with a 6,000-foot runway. This is to be followed by Phase IIA and IIB, at the end of which INS Kadamba will be able to base 50 front-line warships. The Indian Navy is also in the process of constructing a new naval base, INS Varsha, at Rambilli for its Arihant Class submarines.

India plans to construct a pair of aircraft carriers. The first, INS Vikrant, was launched in 2013 by Cochin Shipyard and undocked in June 2015. It is expected to be completed by 2017 and undergo extensive sea trials thereafter with commissioning planned for 2018. Vikrant displaces 40,000 tonnes and will be capable of operating up to 40 aircraft, including 30 HAL Tejas and MiG-29K fighters. The second ship, INS Vishal (formerly known as Indigenous Aircraft Carrier-II), will displace around 65,000 tonnes and is expected to be delivered to the Indian Navy by late 2030s. With the future delivery of Vishal, the Navy’s goal to have three aircraft carriers in service, with two fully operational carriers and the third in refit, will be achieved.

As of November 2011, the Defence Acquisition Council launched the Indian Navy Multi-Role Support Vessel programme. The Indian Navy has subsequently sent out an international RFP for up to 4 large landing helicopter docks. The contenders are expected to tie up with local shipyards for the construction of the ships.

In addition to aircraft carriers and large amphibious assault ships, the Indian Navy is acquiring numerous surface combatants such as; the Visakhapatnam-class destroyers, Project 17A-class and Admiral Grigorovich-class frigates, ASW shallow water corvettes, ASuW corvettes, and MCM vessels. New submarine types include; the conventional Kalvari-class, Project 75I, and the nuclear Arihant-class. New auxiliary ships include; five Replenishment Oilers, a Missile Range Instrumentation Ship and an Ocean Surveillance Ship.

The Indian Navy is planning to procure 22 General Atomics Sea Guardian drones at an estimated cost of $2 billion. This is the first instance of General Atomics drones being sold to a non-NATO military.

Rank Structure

How to Join ?

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